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What is trafficking in persons?

Sex trafficking in which a commercial sex is induced by force, fraud or coercion, or in which the person is induced to perform such act.

Labour trafficking is the recruitment, harbouring, transportation, provision or obtaining of a person for labour or services, through the use of force, fraud or coercion for the purpose of subjection to involuntary servitude, peonage, debt bondage, or slavery.

As in June of 2014, Malaysia has been downgraded to Tier 2 watch list in the US Trafficking in Persons Report.
(USTIP Report 2014)
80% of people trafficked across international borders are women and young girls.
(U.S. Department of State Trafficking Persons Report 2007)
An estimated 1.2 million children are trafficked each year.
(Every Child Counts – ILO 2002)

Effects on survivors

After their rescue, the victims are financially ruined because of the exploitation they experienced. They also suffer from anxiety, as they struggle to tell their family members that they have been exploited, taken advantaged and trafficked. They also fear that members of their local village may even look down upon them. This is added to their stress of being uncertain about their future after their liberation. Often, survivors are traumatised by their experiences, and angry at what they have been made to endure.

What is SUKA doing?

One of SUKA Society’s main aims is to help survivors cope with the effects they are going through. This is done through therapeutic programmes that help survivors learn how to deal with their trauma and stress. We conduct our weekly therapeutic sessions at the government protection shelters in KL, Johor and Negeri Sembilan for both women and children.

We also work behind the scenes; helping to conduct interviews with children who are suspected of being trafficked by syndicates. If a child is unaccompanied or separated from their parents, we help determine which of their options is in their best interest. A training program has also been developed for government officers, to teach them to deal with these children in a more sensitive and appropriate manner.

How can you help?

Help run weekly activity sessions for human trafficking survivors. The sessions are conducted to help provide therapeutic relief from the traumatic experiences.
Conduct fundraising and awareness events to advocate for the protection and care of trafficked survivors.
Donate resources for workshops, arts & craft sessions and festive occasions.